Amazon’s New Plan to Cover Last Mile Delivery

Amazon shipping is now a seller-to-customer service, meaning that the eCommerce firm will pick up packages from sellers’ warehouses and deliveries will span the entire seven-day week. All ground shipments will arrive at their destinations within five calendar days, and for customers that are signed up with Prime, two days (provided that they are within the seller warehouse radius).

Amazon’s shipping costs were $11.5 billion in 2015 and $27.7 billion in 2018 – proving that moving to their own internal operations space might be one of the most innovative ideas they have constructed during their time.

The service is currently operational for sellers that have warehouses in the Chicago, Los Angeles, and New York/New Jersey areas. Amazon is expected to expand their operations service in the near future.

Amazon has firmly planted a flag in the last mile delivery sector of the shipping industry. In the past, those last mile deliveries would have been handed to USPS or other carriers, whereas now, Amazon is bringing delivery directly to customers.

Renault’s Last Mile Experiment

With Earth Day a few days behind us, it only seems right to mention that Renault will present a new electric delivery van at the VIVA Technology fair next month. The van has been specially designed for last-mile urban deliveries and can cover 93 miles on one single charge.

The van is equipped with sensors that monitor the geolocation, mileage range, and acceleration/deceleration of the vehicle. This data will help scientists better understand the daily uses of the van and to improve on internal systems.

Renault currently plans to build a dozen more vans for a two-year, European test. Over two years, Renault will be tweaking and experimenting with the schematics of the electric vehicle. The van is available for use in Europe as of now, but talks of a U.S. partnership with Renault could be seen in the near future.

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