FedEx Places Shipment Limitations for some Retailers 

E-commerce sales are booming during the coronavirus pandemic, and in order to not overwhelm their logistics system, FedEx has placed limits on how many packages some retailers can ship. 

The retailers include Kohl’s, Nordstrom, Hobby Lobby and about two dozen others. This is not the only time that the carrier has placed limits on the amount of packages shipped. A similar action is usually taken around peak seasons, like the holiday season. 

“We are proactively taking steps, similar to what we do during the peak season, to help ensure we continue providing safe and reliable service during these unprecedented times,” a FedEx spokeswoman told the Wall Street Journal

In addition to placing limits on retail shipments, FedEx has also asked some retailers to deliver their packages directly to FedEx ground facilities. This will allow the carrier to skip the step of sorting and speed up delivery times.

FedEx rival UPS has declined to say whether they have plans to place limits on the retailers that they work with, but it is clear that both carriers have been forced to adjust their logistics as the landscape for delivery evolves. 

Amazon Delivery Times Start Returning to Normal 

In a sign that Amazon is beginning to recover from the surge in demand it has seen because of the coronavirus pandemic, the company has said that normal Amazon Prime delivery times of one or two days should be returning. 

In addition to shortening delivery times, on Sunday the company lifted previous restrictions that placed a limit on the amount of inventory suppliers could send to Amazon warehouses. 

“We removed quantity limits on products our suppliers can send to our fulfillment centers,” an Amazon spokeswoman told Time. “We continue to adhere to extensive health and safety measures to protect our associates as they pick, pack and ship products to customers, and are improving speeds across our store.” 

The spike in demand that Amazon experienced was something that the company, and the rest of the logistics world, was unprepared for. The company ended up hiring an additional 175,000 workers in order to get back to its normal level of operations. 

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